Dunking isn’t much different. You’ll likely find yourself getting slightly higher with each attempt at first, but before long, fatigue will set in and your vertical leap will decrease. At this point, it’s a good idea to end the session, rather than try to push through and force yourself to jump higher. It’s an indication that your nervous system has mustered all the energy it has to help you jump, and you need to let it rest. Give your legs a couple days’ off, then come back again and try.
“There aren’t many people in the world who can [dunk], that’s why it has this allure, I guess,” Carter told me last fall, during his first training camp with the Grizzlies. “As far as trying to do it, there are so many ways people can go about it. The approach you’re taking is the right approach. When I was younger, that’s how I started. Tennis ball, to the point that it became easy. Then a volleyball. Then a girls’ ball. Finally I took—it was like a dodgeball. I dunked that and said, ‘You know what, I’m gonna try it.’ Next thing you know. . . .” He shrugged and smiled, the gray whiskers on his jaw sinking into a dimple.
Yet, rate of force development is likely less important for vertical jumping than for faster athletic movements, such as sprinting. This is because the time that is available for force production is *ten times* longer in the vertical jump than in sprinting. Sprinters often take their foot off the ground before their lower body muscles have achieved maximum force (which takes approximately 150ms), but this early period of rising force production plays only a very small role during vertical jumping.
I learned that insects are fucking awesome. There was an insect in particular that I was interested in called the froghopper, or spittlebug, that is basically one of the world’s top jumpers. It’s a survival mechanism. It can jump far, far higher than we can as a function of its weight, basically. So I learned that humans are quite modest in the jumping scheme of things.
El Premio Nobel y ex economista jefe del Banco Mundial, Joseph Stiglitz, escribió una reseña de La doctrina del shock para el New York Times, llamando al paralelismo entre la terapia de choque económico y los experimentos psicológicos realizados por Ewen Cameron "sobredramático y poco convincente" y afirmando que " Klein no es una académica y no puede ser juzgada como tal. Hay muchos lugares en su libro donde se simplifica en exceso." Sin embargo afirma que "la cuestión en contra de estas políticas es aún más fuerte que la que Klein hace" y que el libro contiene "una rica descripción de las maquinaciones políticas necesarias para obligar a desagradables políticas económicas en los países en resistencia."2​ Paul B. Farrell del Dow Jones Business News afirmó que "hay que leer lo que puede ser el libro más importante sobre la economía en el siglo 21".3​ John Gray escribió en The Guardian: "Hay muy pocos libros que realmente nos ayudan a comprender el presente. La doctrina del shock es uno de esos libros."4​ William S. Kowinski del San Francisco Chronicle escribió: "Klein podría haber revelado la narrativa de nuestro tiempo",5​ y fue nombrado uno de los mejores libros de 2007 por el Village Voice, Publishers Weekly,6​ The Observer,7​ y Seattle.8​ El irlandés Times describe los argumentos de Klein como "peso" junto a los informes del Dr. Tom Clonan: "sistemáticamente y con calma se muestra al lector" la forma en que los neoconservadores estaban íntimamente ligadas a los eventos sísmicos que "dieron lugar a la pérdida de millones de vidas". Cerca del final de la revisión del Dr. Clonan, ofrece una síntesis de que el argumento central de Klein es que el proyecto neoconservador no se trata de "la implantación de la democracia", sino una receta represiva por la maximización del beneficio global para una pequeña élite. "Los neoconservadores ven como ideal la proporción de super-ricos/pobres permanentemente ligada a una súper clase de oligarcas empresariales y sus compinches políticos que son el 20%". El 80% restante sería la población del mundo, los pobres "desechables", que subsisten en la "miseria planificada", que no pueden pagar una vivienda adecuada, la educación o la asistencia sanitaria privatizada.9​
Increase your vertical leap. You will need the lifting power of your legs to get you in the air and up to the basket. Building a regimen of leg workouts that will increase the fast-twitch strength and the flexibility of your leg muscles can help you add inches to your vertical leap, getting you that much closer to the rim.[2] A good regimen to get started with might include:
Another high pull option is to shorten the range of motion to make it a hang high pull instead of a power high pull (“power” implying that the load starts on the floor). In this case, the start position is from standing, with the bar hanging in front of your thighs at arms’ length. The movement is initiated with a dip in the hips and knees, so that the bar lowers to just above knee level, followed immediately by an explosive pull.
A more accurate method would be to use a Jump Tester (like these here.) The problem with these, obviously, is that they are way too expensive. In fact, the only scenario in which I recommend using one of these is if you’re a coach, trainer, or athletic director who is purchasing it to test a large number of athletes over time and who needs as accurate of a number as possible for scouting purposes.
The method described above is the most common and simplest way to measure one's vertical jump, but other more scientifically accurate methods have been devised. A pressure pad can be used to measure the time it takes for an athlete to complete a jump, and then using a kinematics equation (h = g × t2/8),[4] the computer can calculate his or her vertical jump based on the time in the air.
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