El Premio Nobel y ex economista jefe del Banco Mundial, Joseph Stiglitz, escribió una reseña de La doctrina del shock para el New York Times, llamando al paralelismo entre la terapia de choque económico y los experimentos psicológicos realizados por Ewen Cameron "sobredramático y poco convincente" y afirmando que " Klein no es una académica y no puede ser juzgada como tal. Hay muchos lugares en su libro donde se simplifica en exceso." Sin embargo afirma que "la cuestión en contra de estas políticas es aún más fuerte que la que Klein hace" y que el libro contiene "una rica descripción de las maquinaciones políticas necesarias para obligar a desagradables políticas económicas en los países en resistencia."2​ Paul B. Farrell del Dow Jones Business News afirmó que "hay que leer lo que puede ser el libro más importante sobre la economía en el siglo 21".3​ John Gray escribió en The Guardian: "Hay muy pocos libros que realmente nos ayudan a comprender el presente. La doctrina del shock es uno de esos libros."4​ William S. Kowinski del San Francisco Chronicle escribió: "Klein podría haber revelado la narrativa de nuestro tiempo",5​ y fue nombrado uno de los mejores libros de 2007 por el Village Voice, Publishers Weekly,6​ The Observer,7​ y Seattle.8​ El irlandés Times describe los argumentos de Klein como "peso" junto a los informes del Dr. Tom Clonan: "sistemáticamente y con calma se muestra al lector" la forma en que los neoconservadores estaban íntimamente ligadas a los eventos sísmicos que "dieron lugar a la pérdida de millones de vidas". Cerca del final de la revisión del Dr. Clonan, ofrece una síntesis de que el argumento central de Klein es que el proyecto neoconservador no se trata de "la implantación de la democracia", sino una receta represiva por la maximización del beneficio global para una pequeña élite. "Los neoconservadores ven como ideal la proporción de super-ricos/pobres permanentemente ligada a una súper clase de oligarcas empresariales y sus compinches políticos que son el 20%". El 80% restante sería la población del mundo, los pobres "desechables", que subsisten en la "miseria planificada", que no pueden pagar una vivienda adecuada, la educación o la asistencia sanitaria privatizada.9​
I'm 33 yrs old, turning 34 in a month. I stand 5'7" and weigh 155 lbs. I used to touch the rim with both hands but now I can only touch the back board... I almost came close to dunking, but that was when I was 22 years old. I still dream of dunking one in...but I think the exercises that I used to do...don't seem to work anymore... Is it still possible for me to dunk even at this age?
Dunking exposes you to some extra risk of injury. First of all, you can get low-bridged or get your legs tangled up with defenders near the hoop, causing you to fall awkwardly from a significant height. You can also throw yourself off balance by trying to hang on the rim and slipping off, resulting in awkward falls. If you are in heavy traffic on the dunk, then being able to grab and hang on the rim until the clutter beneath you clears is a safety technique. If you are in the clear on a dunk, then avoiding hanging on the rim at all is the recommended safety technique (It's also a technical foul to hang on the rim in that situation). Whatever the situation, you need to come down with control and balance. Ankle, knee, neck, and head injuries await those who fail to control their momentum after a dunk.
I am in grade 10, 15 years old and 6'1 3/4". I have big hands and can palm the ball...I could touch rim in grade 8 and getting closer to dunking everyday now..it literally takes no effort to touch rim now but whenever I go for the dunk I get the ball above rim easily but have trouble getting that wrist motion to actually throw the ball in the hoop...and help?

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By emphasizing certain muscles in your legs, you can train your body for the force needed to leap high. Increasing your vertical jump will improve your rebounding, blocking, dunking, and make you an all-around better basketball player. Here are a few of CoachUp’s favorite exercises for improving your leg strength and vertical jump. If you ever need extra motivation to get through these exercises on a daily basis, just re-watch these gifs and focus up!


High pulls can also be done using a dumbbell or kettlebell,. When doing so, position the weight between your feet and pull with one arm at a time (switching arms halfway through the set). A trap bar (aka, hex bar) is also an option, particularly for individuals who have a hard time keeping the lower back flat; the trap bar allows the hands to be positioned behind the shins to help pull the shoulders back.

After four months of failing to pull off anything even resembling a real dunk, the planets aligned on Aug. 9: After at least 19 failed attempts that afternoon, I dunked a soccer ball on a middle school court whose rim measured 9' 11". (The original basketball, incidentally, was a soccer ball, property of Dr. Naismith’s employer, Springfield College.) Video from that afternoon shows me standing there, looking confused, in the moment afterward. Did that just happen? Failing had become so routine that even this small success felt foreign.

Air ball Alley-oop Assist Backboard shattering Ball hog Block Buzzer beater Cherry picking Dribble Crossover Dunk Euro step Fadeaway Fast break Fly Flop Jump shot Layup Finger roll Field goal Four-point play Free throw Hook shot Moves Pick and roll Positions Posterized Playbook Rebound Point Screen Back screen Slashing Steal Three-pointer Three-point play Uncontested shot
The vertical jump involves coordinated spine, hip, knee, and ankle extension to produce force in a vertical direction very quickly, while the muscles are shortening through to a very short muscle length. Since the time available for producing force is long compared to other athletic movements, this reduces the importance of rate of force development. Yet, the force-velocity relationship is the primary determinant of the amount of force that can be exerted at a given movement speed. Therefore, maximum force, velocity, and the force-velocity gradient all affect vertical jump height.
Four times a week, from April through October, I embarked on 90-minute explosive weightlifting sessions based on the years I’d spent working as a strength coach to club, college and professional volleyball players. Squats, squat jumps, deadlifts, lunges, box jumps, cleans, sprints. . . . Three or four days a week I visited one of my local blacktops, where I tried to dunk tennis balls on 10-foot rims or throw down basketballs and volleyballs on lower ones. By May 3—one month in—I could dunk a tennis ball on a 9' 10" rim. I considered this a better-than-good start, not realizing that compared to dunking a basketball, this tennis-ball jam was akin to a child scrawling the diagonal line that begins a capital A on his first day of learning the alphabet.
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I just got the bike on Friday and used it twice over the weekend so this isn't a long-term review but my initial impression is highly favorable. I am a "serious" cyclist, which is not to say I'm a professional or anything like that but I log a lot of miles on my road bike and use high-end equipment. I've always hated hooking a bike up to an indoor trainer and I've avoided that type of training for many years. I finally went in on a spinning bike and I am very impressed with the results.
This isn’t just some light-duty assistance exercise. The rear-foot elevated split squat (aka, Bulgarian split squat) is a legitimate movement for increasing pure glute and quad strength, which will in turn enhance power and vertical jumping performance. Even if you’re a two-foot jumper, focusing on one leg at a time like you do here will ensure that your dominant side isn’t compensating for your weaker leg during the movement.

We have two diferent vertical jump bands that you can use as a volleyball player. The first bands are the M.V.P. Pro bands that are attached at the heels and a belt around the waist. These vertical jump bands can be worn during practice so everytime you jump your are improving your vertical with the resistance provided by the bands. These bands are best if you are 5' 6" or taller.
Before and after every workout, stretch your legs. This can lead to increase flexibility which loosens your muscles and allows them to perform better with a greater range of motion. In other words, they are strong and function better. Be sure to include dynamic stretches into your warm-up to get your joints moving and static stretches into your cool down after the workout.
The primary end point of the trial was the rate of death at 28 days. Secondary end points were the rates of death in the ICU, in the hospital, at 6 months, and at 12 months; the duration of stay in the ICU; the number of days without need for organ support (i.e., vasopressors, ventilators, or renal-replacement therapy); the time to attainment of hemodynamic stability (i.e., time to reach a mean arterial pressure of 65 mm Hg)16; the changes in hemodynamic variables; and the use of dobutamine or other inotropic agents. Adverse events were categorized as arrhythmias (i.e., ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or atrial fibrillation), myocardial necrosis, skin necrosis, ischemia in limbs or distal extremities, or secondary infections.17
Which is why, on April 1, 2014, I dedicated myself to dunking a basketball for the first time. So that I could live it, breathe it, perhaps take a crack at it with my pen. I had tossed this idea around for years, realizing with each passing birthday that my chances of success were dimming. However, on that April Fool’s Day (a coincidence) I spent three hours on the court and at the gym, with a promise to myself to return several times each week until I threw one down like Gerald Green. Or at least like Litterial Green, who played in 148 NBA games between 1992 and ’99, and who, like me, was born in the early ’70s, stands 6'1", 185 pounds and is at no risk of having dunker carved into his epitaph.
The vertical jump is defined as the highest point that the athlete can touch from a standing jump, less the height that the athlete can touch from a standing position. The measurement of the jump is flawed if the athlete is permitted to take one or more steps before jumping, as the athlete will convert some of the energy developed in the step taken into the force of propulsion that generates upward lift. Basketball has numerous legends and other urban myths concerning the seemingly superhuman leaping ability attributed to certain players; one such player, former University of Louisville star Darrell "Dr. Dunkenstein" Griffith, was reputed to possess a 42 in (1 m) vertical leap. It is likely that the average National Basketball Association player 6 ft 6 in (1.97 m) or shorter has a vertical leap of between 25 and 30 in (0.63 and 0.75 m); taller and heavier players will usually not be able to jump as high.
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