From the Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital (D.D.B., A.B., J.-L.V.); the Department of Intensive Care, Brugmann University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles (J.D., P.G.); and the Department of Intensive Care, Centre Hospitalier Etterbeek Ixelles (D.C.) — all in Brussels; the Department of Intensive Care, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Charleroi, Charleroi, Belgium (P.B., P.D.); the Department of Medicine III, Intensive Care Unit 13H1, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (C.M.); and the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Rio Hortega University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain (C.A.).
The force-velocity relationship during muscle shortening occurs because the number of simultaneously attached crossbridges between the myofilaments inside the working muscle fibers determine the amount of force that a fiber can produce. The number of attached crossbridges at any one time is dependent upon the fiber shortening velocity, because the detachment rate of the crossbridges at the end of their working stroke is higher at faster shortening speeds.
Vertical jumps are used to both train and test for power output in athletes. Plyometrics are particularly effective in training for power output, and include vertical jumps of different types in their protocol. In one recent study, training with plyometrics (which included continuous vertical jumps) was shown to improve jump height and boost vertical jump performance to similar degrees in combination with very different resistance training protocols, indicating that the plyometric jumping contributed to the increased jump height more than resistance training. Research into plyometric jumps found vertical jumps to be among the highest in terms of muscle recruitment (as measured by electromyography), power output, and ground reaction force produced.[8][9][10] Fatigue has been researched in athletes for its effect on vertical jump performance, and found to decrease it in basketball players, tennis players, cyclists, rugby players, and healthy adults of both genders.[11][12][13]
Original shocks have a secocnd lower nut that prevents the shock rod from spinning when loosening or tightening the upper mounting nut. The Bilstein shocks are not equipped with the second nut and the shock rod turns while trying to tighten the upper mounting lock nut, making it impossible to tighten. I had to return the shocks and bought a different brand. Also, Bilstein's installation instructions are about the worst I have ever seen.
When I was growing up, basketball was big in my neighborhood. Everyone wanted to be able to dunk on a regulation 10-foot high basket and, thus, everyone focused on improving their vertical jump. The progression usually went a little something like this: touch the rim, grab the rim, hang on the rim, dunk with a volleyball and, finally, dunk with a basketball!

As far as sequels go, Ninn learned a lesson from his ill-fated follow-up to SEX. Without even a second of flashback footage, he designed SHOCK to surpass LATEX in every respect. It succeeds in some ways. In others, it merely (ha !) equals or falls just below its immediately illustrious predecessor. Simply put, and you can quote me on this, if LATEX blew your mind, SHOCK will turn it inside out !
The record for the most WNBA dunks belongs to Brittney Griner. As a high school senior, she dunked 52 times in 32 games and set a single-game record of seven dunks.[47] As a standout at Baylor University, Griner became the seventh player to dunk during a women's college basketball game[48] and the second woman to dunk twice in a single college game.[49] In her WNBA debut on May 27, 2013, Griner dunked twice, and as of 2014, has five WNBA dunks, including the first in a playoff game (August 25, 2014).
Which is why, on April 1, 2014, I dedicated myself to dunking a basketball for the first time. So that I could live it, breathe it, perhaps take a crack at it with my pen. I had tossed this idea around for years, realizing with each passing birthday that my chances of success were dimming. However, on that April Fool’s Day (a coincidence) I spent three hours on the court and at the gym, with a promise to myself to return several times each week until I threw one down like Gerald Green. Or at least like Litterial Green, who played in 148 NBA games between 1992 and ’99, and who, like me, was born in the early ’70s, stands 6'1", 185 pounds and is at no risk of having dunker carved into his epitaph.

Among patients with cardiogenic shock, the rate of death was significantly higher in the group treated with dopamine than in the group treated with norepinephrine, although one might expect that cardiac output would be better maintained with dopamine26-28 than with norepinephrine. The exact cause of the increased mortality cannot be determined, but the early difference in the rate of death suggests that the higher heart rate with dopamine may have contributed to the occurrence of ischemic events. Whatever the mechanism may be, these data strongly challenge the current American College of Cardiology–American Heart Association guidelines, which recommend dopamine as the first-choice agent to increase arterial pressure among patients who have hypotension as a result of an acute myocardial infarction.7

When an individual has a force-velocity gradient angled such that force is too high and velocity is too low, they benefit most from high-velocity strength training exercises with light loads. Conversely, when an individual has a force-velocity gradient angled such that force is too low and velocity is too high, they benefit most from low-velocity strength training exercises with heavy loads. Often, individuals with a long history of heavy strength training display profiles that are not ideal for vertical jumping, because their force is too high, and their velocity is too low, so they need to focus on high-velocity strength training.
As an athlete pushes off the ground, he or she must overcome his/her own body weight. The lighter the athlete, the less force is necessary to do this. Imagine trying to jump as high as you can and then immediately repeating this same test wearing a 20-pound vest. It's obvious that the second jump will be much smaller. Now, imagine how much higher you could jump if you were 20 pounds lighter.
Shock and Vibration is archived in Portico, which provides permanent archiving for electronic scholarly journals, as well as via the LOCKSS initiative. It operates a fully open access publishing model which allows open global access to its published content. This model is supported through Article Processing Charges. For more information on Article Processing charges in general, click here.
I'm 5"11 and 12 years old, and i'm able to touch the rim, but it's very inconsistent. like 50% of the time I can wrap my 3 biggest fingers around it, or i dont touch it the other 50% of the time. I've been training for about 4 months, doing calf raises every day until they cramp, and everyday i try to touch the rim at my gym or school or at any court. I found out i could touch the rim 2 days ago, but is there any way to add 7 inches to my vertical instead of doing thousands of calf raises again, because i really want to be able to dunk by 8th gradr

Our Keep-It™ guarantee is valid for the first-time purchase of a formula, and redeemable up to three months (90 days) after the purchase date. Multiple bottles, foods, apparel and gear do not fall under this guarantee, however, they may be applicable for return. Fitness equipment, personal care products, knowledge purchases, and DVDs are not eligible for return or refund. For more information and a full list of products that qualify, visit our Keep-It™ page. Further details can be found on our Refund Policy support page.
Finally, to make things even more complicated, it is likely that the roles of the lower body muscles may differ according to if: (1) the jump is maximal or sub-maximal, (2) long-term training has occurred, and (3) the individual has a “hip-dominant” or a “knee-dominant” technique. Indeed, the vertical jump is more dependent upon the hip extensors in maximal jumps, compared to in sub-maximal ones. And after long-term jumping training, the increase in the amount of work done in the jump by the hip extensors is related to the increase in height, while the increase in the amount of work done by the knee extensors is not.
Another high pull option is to shorten the range of motion to make it a hang high pull instead of a power high pull (“power” implying that the load starts on the floor). In this case, the start position is from standing, with the bar hanging in front of your thighs at arms’ length. The movement is initiated with a dip in the hips and knees, so that the bar lowers to just above knee level, followed immediately by an explosive pull.

Shock and Vibration is archived in Portico, which provides permanent archiving for electronic scholarly journals, as well as via the LOCKSS initiative. It operates a fully open access publishing model which allows open global access to its published content. This model is supported through Article Processing Charges. For more information on Article Processing charges in general, click here.
I'm 33 yrs old, turning 34 in a month. I stand 5'7" and weigh 155 lbs. I used to touch the rim with both hands but now I can only touch the back board... I almost came close to dunking, but that was when I was 22 years old. I still dream of dunking one in...but I think the exercises that I used to do...don't seem to work anymore... Is it still possible for me to dunk even at this age?
Don't do jumping exercises 7 days a week. Four or five days per week is enough. If you do it every day, you may give up after a week or two. The idea is to keep exercising for months, or years, consistently. Note that we have not organized an actual jumping program. Inside Hoops is providing exercises that should help your fitness and leaping ability.
The phrase "slam dunk" has entered popular usage in American English outside of its basketball meaning, to refer to a "sure thing": an action with a guaranteed outcome, or a similarly impressive achievement. This is related to the high probability of success for a slam dunk versus other types of shots. Additionally, to "be dunked on" is sometimes popularly used to indicate that a person has been easily embarrassed by another, in reference to the embarrassment associated with unsuccessfully trying to prevent an opponent from making a dunk. This ascension to popular usage is reminiscent of, for example, the way that the baseball-inspired phrases "step up to the plate" and "he hit it out of the park," or American football-inspired phrases such as "victory formation" or "hail Mary" have entered popular North American vernacular.
A study was carried out in 2015 to show the effectiveness of different shot types, including slam dunks. The study was carried out across five different levels of basketball (NBA, EuroBasket, the Slovenian 1st Division, and two minor leagues). Overall the study showed that slam dunks were a very effective way of scoring in the game of basketball, particularly in the NBA, which had the highest dunk percentage in the study.[37]
Parte 3, se refiere a los intentos de aplicar la doctrina de choque sin la necesidad de violencia extrema en contra de amplios sectores de la población. La terapia de choque leve de Margaret Thatcher explica cómo se hace posible con la Guerra de las Malvinas, mientras que la reforma del mercado libre en Bolivia ha sido posible gracias a una combinación de una preexistente crisis económica y el carisma de Jeffrey Sachs.

Original shocks have a secocnd lower nut that prevents the shock rod from spinning when loosening or tightening the upper mounting nut. The Bilstein shocks are not equipped with the second nut and the shock rod turns while trying to tighten the upper mounting lock nut, making it impossible to tighten. I had to return the shocks and bought a different brand. Also, Bilstein's installation instructions are about the worst I have ever seen.
I went through this progression, too. I went from touching the middle of the net at 12 years old, to dunking a basketball at 14 years old, to doing serious acrobatic 360-degree dunks at 17 years old. In college, my personal record for the vertical leap was 40 inches. At my peak, I was able to touch the top of the square on a regulation backboard, about 11.5 feet from the ground. Even now, in my thirties, I can dunk a basketball while standing underneath the basket—no run up required. I owe it all to the power of the vertical jump.
Whichever equipment you use, the first thing you’ll need to do is measure your reach standing flat-footed on the floor with one arm fully extended straight overhead. (You can measure your reach up against a wall for the chalk option.) Then, when you mark the highest point you touched, you’ll subtract your reach from that number. For example, if your reach is 90 inches and you touched 115 inches up on the wall with your chalk, your vertical leap is 25 inches.
We’re confident you’ll love your Onnit supplements. If the product doesn't perform for you, however, we’re not gonna play games with you. Order any of our entry size supplements, and if you don’t like it, you can keep it! Notify our team, telling us why it wasn't a fit for you, and we’ll get you a refund right there on the spot - no return necessary. We just ask that you try it out for at least two weeks to give it a fair shot.
At the competitive level (i.e., the NFL and NBA combines), vertical leap is measured using a “jump tester”—a tripod with a series of thin plastic sticks one inch apart. If you have access to this equipment, it’s your best bet for getting an accurate measurement. A cheaper, more feasible option is to do your jump next to a wall and mark the highest point you touch with a piece of chalk.
The baseline dunk is an approach-modifier of any dunk type in which the player approaches the basket along the court-boundary (baseline) which runs parallel with the backboard. In the game setting, the dunk often comes as the result of a pass, creating an assist opportunity for a teammate. In the contest, the baseline approach may be used as a means of convenience, facilitating a particular dunk type (e.g., passes bounced off the side of the backboard or its padding) or to increase the difficulty of a dunk type in hopes of meriting higher scores.
“There’s something about dunking a basketball that lures us in,” he said, reflecting on his first jam, during lunch period his sophomore year at De La Salle High in Concord, Calif., back when his driver’s license read 5' 11", 112 pounds. “It stokes the imagination. It’s something you always dream of doing. I have a friend whose father, at age 50, is trying to dunk.”
Early in my mission, my editor had given me a book, Jump Attack, by Tim Grover, personal trainer to Jordan, Dwyane Wade and myriad other NBA stars. I’d ignored it at first; I figured I knew plenty about how to jump higher. When I finally opened it last December, I was further dissuaded. The exercises Grover prescribed to increase one’s vertical leap looked either nonsensical (hold a deep lunge for 90 excruciating seconds, without moving) or sadistic (the series of rapid-fire bursts and landings that he’d named “attack depth jumps”). These self-immolations, Grover wrote, would last for three months.
Perform the routine every second day to give your body a days rest in-between workouts. This means that on week one you’ll be training 4 times a week, week two you’ll be training 3 times per week, and on week three you’ll be training 4 times per week. That ends up being 11 workouts per phase for a total of 33 workouts in the program. Also, during this program you will be taking one week off between each phase to let your body completely recover. You need to give your muscles time to fully repair in order to grow stronger and more explosive.
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