We purchased this because of its safety evaluation and the high ratings. I did evaluate the negative reviews and was prepared for the issues reported, however; I found none of the comments in the negative reviews to be valid with our experience. First, for the people who complained about the assembly instructions- there are pictures....yes, the English is horrible, but there are pictures! Total assembly time, with one human, was 2 hours and 10 minutes. Assembly of the safety cage was the the most difficult part. Specifically, the foam comes in two sections, which makes it difficult to slide into the pocket. BUT, with a little patience it can be done. Second, to those who would rather purchase a unit from Walmart- this is a very fine product, with consumer quality pieces, they include gloves, spring tool, and a ladder- you don't get ... full review
No, I think there’s a practical aspect to that. It’s hard to grip a basketball. I mean, that’s another physical challenge. I have pretty small hands, and one thing I had to train myself to do, which I couldn’t do at the start of this project, is palm a basketball. So that involved fingertip push-ups, to get the tips of your fingers much stronger. It involves, while hanging out and watching television, trying to palm a basketball for as long as you can. You want to get into a quick, full sprint, and you want to be able to grip the basketball as you go up to jam it. So doing those things can be a challenge. That’s partly what’s behind people doing the alley-oop-type things or throwing it up off the backboard. In some cases, they simply can’t grip the ball on the way to the hoop, so their solution is to throw it in the air, catch it, and try to bring it down.
Dunking became a game again. After my closest misses I’d hop around and swear like a golfer whose playoff putt had lipped out. These outbursts were no longer harsh self-admonitions but celebrations of my progress, acknowledgements that I was getting tantalizingly close. I could feel my legs gaining in bounciness. I could feel my hips, quads and calves learning to fire simultaneously. My original lobber returned to the scene and suggested I try dunking in the morning instead of the evening, when the batteries in our old bodies are as low as the ones in our phones. I added this sage advice to the long list of micro­details “that help you steal inches,” as Todd had phrased it months earlier. “A quarter inch here, a half inch there.”
Vertical jump measurements are used primarily in athletic circles to measure performance. The most common sports in which one's vertical jump is measured are track and field, netball, basketball, football, and volleyball, but many sports measure their players' vertical jumping ability during physical examinations. In addition, single and multiple vertical jumps are occasionally used to assess muscular strength and anaerobic power in athletes.[3]
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