The opening scene finds Modern Messiah Malcolm Stevens (the tragically deceased Jon Dough recreating his career-defining character) back in his familiar padded cell. Out of thin air, his lost lady love Gwen (Jeanna Fine, resplendent in stylized Marilyn Monroe Kabuki make-up) appears as an echo of the original's psychiatric theory that Stevens concocted his entire past out of years of transfixed TV ogling à la Jim Carrey's CABLE GUY. This proves to be the film's first of many technical knockouts, shot in black and white complete with scratches and splices to suggest an old movie, the tiniest splash of pink occurring as Jeanna vibrates herself into a frenzy. Malcolm still has a problem projecting himself into his own fantasies and is, at first almost subliminally, replaced by tattooed muscle boy John Decker, the mesmerizing lead from Paul Thomas' terrific MARISSA. 

Among patients with cardiogenic shock, the rate of death was significantly higher in the group treated with dopamine than in the group treated with norepinephrine, although one might expect that cardiac output would be better maintained with dopamine26-28 than with norepinephrine. The exact cause of the increased mortality cannot be determined, but the early difference in the rate of death suggests that the higher heart rate with dopamine may have contributed to the occurrence of ischemic events. Whatever the mechanism may be, these data strongly challenge the current American College of Cardiology–American Heart Association guidelines, which recommend dopamine as the first-choice agent to increase arterial pressure among patients who have hypotension as a result of an acute myocardial infarction.7
these shocks make a big difference in handling and ride on the2015 4wd F250. This will make the suspension work rather than the whole vehicle simply shuddering up and down over small bumps and holes in the road. Tires stay in contact with road, suspension moves, you and the seat stay still, what a concept! OEM shocks don't even move once compressed, pityful. You will need an 18 mm wrench or socket for lower shock mount bolts and a 21 mm open end, box end or deep socket for the top mount nut and a 20mm or adjustable wrench for the shaft bolt on the top mount. Once the old shocks are off, you need a 19mm open end or socket for the Bilstein top mount nut and you hold the shaft from moving with a hex key, in my experience I didn't really need that but you may want to. Check the top of the shaft you'll see a hex hole up there, seems like it was a 6mm but don't hold me to that. Forget any jacking, removing tires, etc to do this it isn't necessary, and much safer with wheels on the ground while you are under there. If you need some space I drove the wheel I was working on over a 2x12 and that gave me a little height to work with. I wasn't in the mood to fool with jacks, jack stands and all that. No need to. Just crank the steering wheel over away from the side you are working on and you'll have plenty of room. The only issue is after attaching the lower shock mounts using the OEM 18mm bolt/nut, you need to compress the shock about 3" to get it into the upper mounting hole. I used a common tie down racheting strap for this job. I hooked one hook to the chassis right under the lower shock mount bracket on the truck and after adjusting the strap length I put the upper hook around the top shock rubber grommet and washer (lower one already installed now, put upper ones on after shock is in place, of course). At this point you just crank the rachet on the strap until the shock compresses a few inches and shove the shaft under the mounting hole, release the rachet and up pops the shock into place. Put on upper grommet and washer, tighten 19mm nut and presto! IF the shaft turns while you tighten this nut hold the shaft still with the hex key mentioned earlier. Your truck is now a better place to be. Also just tighten upper nut until the grommet fills or slightly goes outside the washer, don't crank it down and flatten the grommet. If you aren't sure look at the OEM arrangement for an idea on how tight to go with that nut. Happy motoring !!
An alley-oop dunk, as it is colloquially known, is performed when a pass is caught in the air and then dunked. The application of an alley-oop to a slam dunk occurs in both games and contests. In games, when only fractions of a second remain on the game or shot clock, an alley-oop may be attempted on in-bound pass because neither clock resumes counting down until an in-bounds player touches the ball. The images to the right depict an interval spanning 1/5 of a second.
My warmup on March 29, following a day of recovery, left me feeling hoppier than I’d expected, and not nearly as achy. After 10 devastating near misses, and several others that weren’t as close, Jeff lofted the best lob I would see during this journey. I leaped, controlled it with one hand and—boodaloomp—in and out. I could have wept. “You got this!” Jeff implored. “You know you got this!”

7. Antman EM, Anbe DT, Armstrong PW, et al. ACC/AHA guidelines for the management of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee to Revise the 1999 Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction). Circulation 2004;110:e82-e292[Erratum, Circulation 2005;111:2013-4, 2007;115(15):e411.]


Perhaps the most popular obstruction-modified dunk is the Dubble-Up. Aptly eponymous of the its pioneer—T-Dub, an American dunker hailing from Minnesota—the Dubble-Up starts with a person standing before the basket, holding the ball above their head. The dunker approaches and leaps as though their groin would soar above just above the head and their legs around the stationary person. Just prior to clearing the person, the dunker will assume control of the ball with one or both hands, guide it under a raised leg, transferring it to the appropriate hand, clearing the ball-holder, raising the ball above the horizontal plane of the rim, and finally guiding it downward through the basket. While the Dubble-Up mimics a between-the-legs dunk, Kenny Dobbs and Justin Darlington have both performed an under-both-legs variant.
Finally, to make things even more complicated, it is likely that the roles of the lower body muscles may differ according to if: (1) the jump is maximal or sub-maximal, (2) long-term training has occurred, and (3) the individual has a “hip-dominant” or a “knee-dominant” technique. Indeed, the vertical jump is more dependent upon the hip extensors in maximal jumps, compared to in sub-maximal ones. And after long-term jumping training, the increase in the amount of work done in the jump by the hip extensors is related to the increase in height, while the increase in the amount of work done by the knee extensors is not.

In the 2008 Sprite Rising Star's Slam Dunk Contest Dwight Howard performed the "Superman" dunk. He donned a Superman outfit as Orlando Magic guard Jameer Nelson tied a cape around his shoulders. Nelson alley-ooped the basketball as Howard jumped from within the key side of the free throw circle line, caught the ball, and threw it through the rim. This dunk is somewhat controversial, as his hand was not over as well as on a vertical plane to the rim. Some insist that it should in fact be considered a dunk because the ball was thrust downward into the basket, meeting the basic definition of the dunk.


Slow-Motion Squats – Involves standing with your feet shoulder width apart. From this position slowly lower down until you are in a deep squat making sure your heels are flat on the ground. Hold for 2 seconds before slowly rising back to the starting position. The descent and rise should each take 4 seconds to complete. Throughout the entire exercise make sure to keep your head up and your back straight.
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